Memories from Kamerlingh, 2021
Concrete, steel rods

Theses pieces were part of the show: “Architecture of Goodbye” at Laurel project space in November 2021.

"Elena Giolo’s artistic practice currently focuses on the aesthetics and narratives inherent to fossils and their relationship to architecture. Both fossils and buildings give us glimpses of the past they symbolise, and these glimpses sparked Elena’s most recent body of work. In Memories from Kamerlingh she attempts to capture some of these flashes of the past, born from external and internal features from the Kamerlingh Onneslaan building. By reimagining aspects of the building such as the stained glass windows, imprints of vegetation from the courtyard and the facade she shows us a different perspective on remembrance. Through her sculptures, artefacts and ‘false fossils’ Elena stages an archeological site - using steel reinforcement cages as her canvas."

Text by Jean-Michel Mabruki Mussa

Metamorphosis Part I, 2021
Albast ceramic, resin

is inspired by the metamorphosis of the caterpillar. During its transformation, the caterpillar's body becomes mush, only the imaginary discs remain intact. These allow keeping the memory of the body of the caterpillar which will then be transmitted to the butterfly. Inspired by this phenomenon, I have created sculptures and prints that explore the idea of memory passing from one body to another.

Tears of Sleeping Birds, 2020
Wax, metal

is the beginning of sculptural research on tears and its materiality. The project is inspired by the Amazonian moth erbid moth (Gorgone Macarea) which drinks the tears of sleeping birds to feed on nutrients such as sodium or proteins.

MUMBLING BUMBLING GRUMBLING, 2018
ceramics, foam, electrical cables, paint

"A twitch: when an animal turns out to keep some machine inside it. A stutter: when the ghost-in-the-machine drops its sheet and turns out (surprise!) to be another machine. A blush: a ghost that feels, falls, gets embarrassed: and an animal that doesn’t so much fall as descend, revealing its soft belts and rotors. The animal is busy becoming a machine, which is busy becoming a ghost, which is busy becoming an animal becoming a machine becoming a ghost becoming a... These involuntary gestures reveal the others in ourselves, the sensitive machines and psychological animals and repetitive ghosts. They make us strangers to ourselves. Everywhere we keep company with strangers. "

By Becket Flannery

Alien Hands, 2016
Fabric, electrical cables, latex

Presented in 2016 at the Stedelijk Museum in Amsterdam during the exhibition UNCUT: Hold Me Now - Feel and Touch in an Unreal World